Monday, April 14, 2014

You Can Check Out But You Can Never Leave

As we posted before, sometimes getting OUT of Obamacare is as difficult as getting in. 

Well, it get's worse.

A fellow agent in the midwest has two clients that are turning 65 and would like to get OUT of Obamacare and INTO Medicare.

But they can't.

Both bought through the exchange.

In his own words . . .
First case tried to log in (to healthcare.guv) and do life event and change the needed information on the application. It removes any/all subsidy for the spouse who is not Medicare. Agent in my office could have made this easier by putting the account in husband's name, not the wife.
The second, my 10am this morning, was a DIY case, no log in, will have to call the exchange this morning. Same, account should have been put in his name and not hers since she was only a few months off Medicare.

Yes my friends, it seems it is easier to enter the U.S. illegally than to get rid of your Obamacare plan.

Pesach 5774 / Passover 2014

Tonight marks the first evening of Passover, and the first of the two traditional meals called "seders" ("seder" means "order"). It's a ritual and a meal, and commemorates the end of the Israelites' 400 year stint as slaves to the Egyptians.

I use the term "Israelites" because there is a significant school of thought which holds that we didn't really become "Jews" until the Covenant at Sinai.

The ritual itself, at least as practiced today, dates back about 1000 years or so, so it's actually a rather recent addition to our history. Still, it's by far my favorite "Chag" (holiday). This year, as most, we will host seders both nights, with a great (and different) mix of folks at both.

Chag Pesach Sameyach!

(PS Click here for a detailed and interesting deconstruction of so-called "Christian Seders")

Caution, Socialism at Work

Universal health care is a wonderful consideration, but the political dogma doesn't match up with results.  

We were told the U.S. was the only civilized nation that did not have free health care. 


Is free better?

Half of nurses are working through breaks or beyond their shift, revealing a health service under severe strain
Three out of five of those questioned felt that staff numbers led to lower standards of care, while almost half said they were looking after eight or more patients.

And this is good in what way?
"Despite all the government rhetoric, despite the Francis, Keogh and Cavendish reports, the spectre of another Mid Staffs still looms large over theNHS. Progress on safe staffing levels has been glacial and that means poorer care and patients still at risk.
"It's clear that despite nurses working through breaks and beyond their hours, they simply do not have enough time to give patients the care and attention they need. That is distressing for patients and for the staff trying to care for them.
Government rhetoric.
Has a familiar ring . . .
"The government needs to face up to the damage it is inflicting on patients and staff, by not introducing legally enforceable nurse-to-patient ratios, and take urgent action."
So a problem created by the government needs a government fix?
Egad. It's worse than I thought. Does Britain have low information voters too?
Stupid is as stupid does.

Goodbye Shecantbeserious, Hello Burntwell

While I realize that it's not a "done deal," the latest from DC tells us that the ObamaTax is in the very best of hands:

Dumpster-diving Diva Burntwell seems to be eminently qualified to continue the ObamaTax.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

Split Personality

The creators of Obamacare envisioned a massive overhaul of the U.S. health care system that
would insure millions. Noble idea, long on grand intentions, short on effectiveness.
Liz Linton feels stuck in health insurance limbo. She has policies protecting herself and her husband, but no coverage for her two children. "They pretty much told me I'm out of luck," said Linton. "If something happens, you're responsible for the bill." On December 16th, the Goreville mother met with an enrollment counselor. She discovered her children qualified for the All Kids state program.  "I signed up," said Linton. "She told me it would probably be a month or two before we hear anything." However, two months have now stretched into more than four. Her youngest child also came down with a case of bronchitis.

The Medicaid angle isn't working so well. Too many people want free health insurance.

But Mrs. Linton should share some of the blame. Open enrollment started October 1, but she waited until December 16 to start the process.

She rolled the dice and lost.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Cavalcade of Risk #206: Call for submissions

Dennis Wall hosts next week's Cav. Entries are due by Monday (the 14th).

To submit your risk-related post, just click here to email it.

Dennis would specifically like to see posts about residential mortgages, force-placed insurance, the participants in the mortgage process, the participants in securitization of mortgages.
You'll need to provide:

■ Your post's url and title
■ Your blog's url and name
■ Your name and email
■ A (brief) summary of the post

PLEASE remember: ONLY posts that relate to risk (not personal finance tips and the like). And please only submit if you are willing to link back to the carnival if your submission is accepted.

Patrick's in The Federalist (Again)!

For the second time in as many months, co-blogger Patrick has penned a post for The Federalist. This time, he discusses O'Care's impact on Employer-based (ie group) health insurance plans:

"Now that there is a tax for not having it many have simply added on to their employer’s plan. As shown in the Kaiser Employer Sponsored Benefits Survey from 2013, small employers foot a significant portion of the premium."

Definitely read the whole thing.